HomeAbout USARECMarketing and Engagement BrigadeArmy Marksmanship UnitArmy Marksmanship Team Members

ARMY MARKSMANSHIP UNIT LEADERSHIP

 


Commander
Lt. Col Harris T. Lawrence III
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Command Sergeant Major
COMMAND SGT. MAJ. JASON E. LEVY
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ARMY MARKSMANSHIP UNIT TEAMS

The U. S. Army Marksmanship Unit teams consist of Action Shooting, Custom Firearms Shop, Instructor Training Group, International Rifle, Service Pistol, Service Rifle, and Shotgun. Learn about each of those teams by clicking the links below. 

ACTION SHOOTING

 

When the United States Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) was established in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Action Shooting was yet to be born. The International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) was officially founded at the International Pistol Conference held in Columbia, Missouri, in May 1976.

The promotion of accuracy, power, and speed as three equal elements was the prime objective of the Conference along with procedures and rules for safe gun handling.

In 1984, the United States Practical Shooting Association (USPSA) was incorporated as the governing body for the US Region of IPSC. In 1992 the Action Shooting Team was created as a part of the Service Pistol Section.In 2004 the Action Shooting team was reorganized as a separate team and re-designated the Action Shooting and Combat training Team.

Practical Shooting attempts to measure the ability to shoot rapidly and accurately with a full power handgun rifle and or shotgun. Those 3 elements – Speed, Accuracy, and Power - form the three sides of the Practical shooting triangle. By design each match will measure shooters ability in all three areas, to do this, shooters take on obstacle laden shooting courses (called stages) requiring anywhere from six to thirty plus shots to complete. The scoring system measures points scored per second, then weights the score to compensate for the number of shots fired. If the shooter misses a target, or shoots inaccurately, points are deducted, lowering that all important points-per-second score.

If shooting has an “Extreme” sport then Action Shooting is it. Competitors move negotiate obstacles, run, speed-reload, and drive there guns through each of several courses as fast as there skill will allow. In our sport, just as in combat both speed and accuracy are equally important. A fast run with poor hits or misses is likely to cost you the match just as perfect shots and a slow time will not win. The key to success is a balance of speed and accuracy, just like a gun fight.

CUSTOM FIREARMS SHOP

 

The USAMU Custom Firearms Shop produces top-quality, match-grade rifles, pistols and shotguns, as well as much of the ammunition for the Army Marksmanship Unit. The Firearms Shop has a proven track record of providing the Army with its precision long-range small arms.  The USAMU Custom Firearms Shop developed and built the weapons that became the sniper systems employed by the Army for more than five decades.   The small arms innovations resulting from the Unit’s effort to achieve the highest levels of accuracy and precision in national and international competition have directly contributed to improving the Army’s small arms capabilities.  USAMU works closely with Soldier Requirements Division, Small Arms Branch, MCOE, to assess the latest technologies associated with weapons and ammunition for application to capability documents and/or improvements to current systems. 

USAMU also provided rapid production and fielding of precision small arms in direct support to FORSCOM Units deploying to combat.  In response to two Operational Needs Statements (2004 and 2006) submitted by 3rd Infantry Division (3ID) to HQDA for modification of M16A2 Rifles for their Squad Designated Marksmanship program, USAMU built 296 SDMRs to add to the capability and lethality of 3ID dismounted squads in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM.

The USAMU enhances the Army’s recruiting effort, raises the standard of the Army’s Marksmanship proficiency, and supports the Army’s small arms research and development initiatives in order to raise the Army’s overall combat readiness.

INSTRUCTOR TRAINING GROUP

 

The Instructor Training Group Soldiers serve as the primary instructors in support for the USAMU’s mission to improve small arms lethality.

Made up of combat veterans with a wealth of knowledge and first-hand experience, the Instructor Training Group Soldiers conduct tailored marksmanship training courses wherever they are asked to go. These mobile training teams provide effective marksmanship training courses and subject matter expertise to assist commanders in achieving their mission.

INTERNATIONAL RIFLE

 

The International Team’s missions are to raise the standard of marksmanship and combat readiness throughout the Army and to enhance the Army’s recruiting effort. The team accomplishes the first element of its missions by conducting Basic Rifle Marksman Courses on Fort Benning for Active Army, Army Reserve, National Guard, and ROTC units. The team also works with the USAMU's Research and Developed and Customs Firearms Shop as a proving ground for technology that can be passed on to the Army Warfighter.

The International Team enhances the Army’s recruiting effort by interacting with the public through various competitions that include National Championships, Regional, Junior, and JROTC events.

Over 2,500 people pass through the International Team’s Pool Range Complex annually as competitors or spectators to these competitions. The team also conducts clinics in conjunction with the National Matches at Camp Perry, the USA Shooting National Championships, and various other competitions. These clinics consist of a period of classroom instruction by the instructors of the International Team, followed by hands-on range firing. The International Team is also invited to the NRA Jr. Clinic at Camp Perry, sharing their Army Story with the juniors, coaches, and families in attendance.

There are five different kinds of rifles used in International Rifle competition. The first is air-rifle which is shot in the standing position at 10 meters and fires a .177 caliber lead pellet. Also used are the smallbore free-rifle and ladies sport rifle. These are .22 caliber rifles fired at 50 meters. Men's events include a three-position match and a prone only match. Ladies also shoot a three-position match and prone only match. The air-rifle and smallbore rifles are used in all of the competitions listed above except for the CISM matches. The final kinds of rifles are those used in 300 meter competition. A big bore free-rifle, similar to the smallbore free-rifle above is used in 300 meter three-position and prone matches shot at the World Championships and Pan American Games. There is also a 300 meter standard rifle that has similar dimensions to an air-rifle, but has minimum trigger weight. This standard rifle is used in the World Championship, Pan American, and CISM competitions. All 300 meter rifles can use a maximum of 8mm cartridge.

The International Rifle Section enjoys a rich history of success in all national and international competitions, up to and including the Olympic Games. Soldiers from IR have amassed 14 Olympic medals since the USAMU inception in 1956. They have also won countless medals won in Pan American Games, World Championships, and the World Cups. During these international competitions 84 world records have been set in both team and individual events by section members. There are three past Olympians, three World Record Holders and three World Champions currently assigned to this section.

Ultimately, competing in and winning National and International level competitions enables the International Team to share the knowledge gained from these competitions with the broader Army in an effort to increase the Army’s combat readiness. These competitions also enable the team to connect America’s people with America’s Army in unique ways that may support the overall Army accessions mission and subsequently raise the Army’s combat readiness as well.

SERVICE PISTOL

 

The Service Pistol Team’s missions are to raise the standard of marksmanship and combat readiness throughout the Army and to enhance the Army’s recruiting effort. The team accomplishes the first element of its missions by conducting multiple Train the Trainer courses both at home and abroad.

The Service Pistol Team enhances the Army’s recruiting effort by interacting with the public at the Small Arms Firing School (SAFS). SAFS is conducted in conjunction with the National Matches. Begun in 1903, and mandated by US Code, SAFS is a program of instruction designed to instruct civilians in the use of the current Service Rifle (M16A2) and Service Pistol (M9). SAFS consists of a period of classroom instruction, by the instructors of the Service Pistol Team, followed by hands-on range firing.

The Service Pistol Team conducts its unique outreach mission through planning and conducting various pistol matches. The team runs the Pistol phase of the US Army Small Arms Championships (also referred to as the “All Army”). Service Pistol members provide marksmanship instruction prior to firing, and carefully mentor the competitors throughout the matches. During these Championships, Soldiers compete with issue weapons and full combat equipment in a variety of events, emphasizing both precision marksmanship and physical fitness.

The team competes with a variety of pistols. Shooters participate in slow-fire (at 50 yards), timed-fire and rapid-fire matches (both at 25 yards), which make up the National Match Course and aggregate competitions using .22-caliber, center-fire and .45-caliber pistols as well as a highly accurized version of the M9 pistol.

The Service Pistol Team also competes in NRA Action Pistol Championships which requires extreme accuracy over a four stage event. NRA Action Pistol is considered to be one of the most difficult pistol championships in all of pistol shooting sports.

Ultimately, competing in and winning the Interservice and National Championship Matches, as well as numerous Local, State, and Regional Championships enables the Service Pistol Team to share the knowledge gained from these competitions with the broader Army in an effort to increase the Army’s combat readiness. These competitions also enable the team to connect America’s people with America’s Army in unique ways that may support the overall Army accessions mission and subsequently raise the Army’s combat readiness as well.

 

SERVICE RIFLE

 

The Service Rifle Team’s missions are to raise the standard of marksmanship and combat readiness throughout the Army and to enhance the Army’s recruiting effort. The team accomplishes the first element of its missions by conducting multiple Train the Trainer courses both at home and abroad.

The Service Rifle Team enhances the Army’s recruiting effort by interacting with the public at the Small Arms Firing School (SAFS). SAFS is conducted in conjunction with the National Matches. Begun in 1903, and mandated by US Code, SAFS is a program of instruction designed to instruct civilians in the use of the current Service Rifle (M16A2) and Service Pistol (M9). SAFS consists of a period of classroom instruction, by the instructors of the Service Rifle Team, followed by hands-on range firing and a modified EIC match.

The Service Rifle Team conducts its unique outreach mission through planning and conducting various rifle matches.

The team runs the Rifle phase of the US Army Small Arms Championships (also referred to as the “All Army”). Service Rifle members provide marksmanship instruction prior to firing, and carefully mentor the competitors throughout the matches. During these Championships, Soldiers compete with issue weapons and full combat equipment in a variety of events, emphasizing both precision marksmanship and physical fitness.

The team competes, primarily, with an accurized version of the M16A2 rifle at distances of 200 to 1000 yards. Select members of the team also compete with bolt-action rifles equipped with both telescopic and aperture sights from 800 to 1000 yards.

Ultimately, competing in and winning the Interservice and National Championship Matches, as well as numerous Local, State, and Regional Championships enables the Service Rifle Team to share the knowledge gained from these competitions with the broader Army in an effort to increase the Army’s combat readiness. These competitions also enable the team to connect America’s people with America’s Army in unique ways that may support the overall Army accessions mission and subsequently raise the Army’s combat readiness as well.

 

SHOTGUN

 

The Shotgun Team’s missions are to raise the standard of marksmanship and combat readiness throughout the Army and to enhance the Army’s recruiting effort. The team focuses on enhancing the Army’s recruiting effort through interacting with the public through youth shooting events, teaching shooting clinics, and conducting trick shooting demonstrations.

The Shotgun Team also competes in Interservice, national, international and Olympic competitions. The team’s most important matches include the World Championships, National Championships every summer, World Cups and the Olympics. Ultimately, competing in and winning these events enables the Shotgun Team to share the knowledge gained from these competitions with the broader Army in an effort to increase the Army’s combat readiness. These competitions also enable the team to connect America’s people with America’s Army in unique ways that may support the overall Army accessions mission and subsequently raise the Army’s combat readiness as well.